Joan Erber

Joan Erber
  • Post Doctoral Fellow Psychology Washington University- Saint Louis, MO
  • Ph.D. Developmental Psychology Saint Louis University- Saint Louis, MO
  • MS. Developmental Psychology Saint Louis University- Saint Louis, MO
  • BA Psychology Washington University- Saint Louis, MO

Research Interests

Dr. Erber received her graduate training at Saint Louis University in Experimental-Developmental Psychology. Subsequently, she completed a Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Aging and Development at Washington University in St. Louis. Dr. Erber conducts research on the Psychology of Aging. She has published over 40 articles and chapters on aging and memory and how stereotypes of aging influence our perceptions and evaluations of older adults. Her research findings are published in scientific journals such as Psychology and Aging and the Journal of Gerontology. Dr. Erber has served on the editorial boards of journals that publish research on aging. She holds Fellowship Status in The Gerontological Society of America and the American Psychological Association. She has served as President of the Adult Development and Aging Division of the American Psychological Association. Dr. Erber teaches courses in the Psychology of Adulthood and the Psychology of Aging.

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Select Publications

Erber, J. T., & Long, B.A. (2006). Perceptions of forgetful and slow employees: Does age matter? Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences, 61B, P333-P339.

Erber, J. T. (2004). So you want to grow old? Facing the specter of ageism. Contemporary Psychology: APA Review of Books, 49, 12-15.

Erber, J. T., & Szuchman, L. T. (2002). Age and capability: The role of forgetting and personal traits. International Journal of Aging and Human Development, 54, 173-189.

Erber, J. T., Szuchman, L. T., & Prager, I. G. (2001). Ain’t misbehavin’: The effects of age and intentionality on judgments about misconduct. Psychology and Aging, 16, 85-95.

Erber, J. T., & Prager, I. G. (2000). Age and excuses for forgetting: Self-handicapping versus damage-control Strategies. International Journal of Aging and Human Development, 50, 201-214.

Guo, X., Erber, J. T., & Szuchman, L. T. (1999). Age and forgetfulness: Can stereotypes be modified? Educational Gerontology,25, 457-466.

Erber, J. T., & Prager, I. G. (1997). Age and forgetfulness: Absolute versus comparison judgments about capability. Experimental Aging Research, 23, 355-367

Erber, J. T., Szuchman, L. T., & Prager, I. G. (1997). Forgetful but forgiven: How age and lifestyle affect perceptions of memory failure. Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences, 52B, P303-P307.

Erber, J. T., Caiola, M. A., & Williams, M., & Prager, I. G. (1997). Age and forgetfulness: The effect of implicit priming. Experimental Aging Research, 23,1-1

Courses Taught

  • Psychology of Aging
  • Psychology of Adulthood
  • Research Methods
  • Introductory Psychology
  • Child Psychology
  • Human Development (Life-span)
  • Current Issues in Aging
  • Issues in Developmental Psychology (Graduate level course)
  • Proseminar in Adult Development and Aging (Graduate level core course for Ph.D. program)
  • Seminar in Cognitive Processes and Aging (Graduate level)